Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

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Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby GrahameR » Tue 18 May, 2021 2:23 pm

Okay I know ... layers.
But ... as recommended ... I've tried a base layer (wool thermal) and I've tried minimising what's over it. However, with full on activity I can't see how I can completely avoid sweating.
So it seems like a Catch22. If I'm sweaty with a lighter layer over it the more the wind chills me but the heavier the layer over the thermal then the more I sweat.
BTW, I understand that when I stop I must rug up. Got all that. But is there a solution to this?
The best solution I can find is to ensure the 'over layer(s)' has front buttons or zippers so I can more easily regulate my temperature.
But how do the most serious of mountaineers deal with this? For them sweat and extreme cold and wind would be a killer.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby wayno » Tue 18 May, 2021 2:33 pm

Your base layer is not meant to keep you warm

base layers are meant to prevent you from getting cold, not to keep you warm

have a base layer thats as breathable as possible and thin as possible to minimise moisture being trapped in it and against your skin...

http://www.outdoorsfather.com/2016/11/b ... keep-warm/
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Warin » Tue 18 May, 2021 2:48 pm

Decrease your activity level and you decrease the heat you generate. So if your getting too hot, cannot unzip further and cannot reduce your clothing layers .. then slow down.

And don't forget-

Be brave, start cold.
Last edited by Warin on Tue 18 May, 2021 4:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Son of a Beach » Tue 18 May, 2021 2:56 pm

People vary in how much it affects them, but my body has fairly ordinary thermo-regulation. My wife laughs at me taking layers on, off, on, off, on, off... all day. And that's just without even leaving the house! Washing up in a sink of hot water is definitely a topless job for me... it makes me sweat profusely if I'm not already very cold (and if I am already very cold, it warms me up nicely).

When bushwalking, I take off enough layers so that I don't overheat, and therefore I'm less likely to sweat too much. If I'm too cold, I add more layers, but not enough to make me warm enough to sweat.

However, this is a fairly flawed strategy, as a decent walk on a hot day, or even a steep walk on a cold day will get me sweating. Just the other day, my kids laughed at a photo that they saw of me climbing Mt Oakleigh topless in winter. It was the only way I could get cool enough to avoid too much sweating. Worked a treat. And of course, I had to add a few layers back on as we came out of the forest and onto the exposed plateau. On, off, on, off, on, off. Story of my life. Seems to be entertaining for the rest of my family.

I guess what I'm trying to suggest is simply to make sure that you have a base layer that is thin and light enough to not be too hot when you are walking hard up a sheltered but steep incline, and enough other layers to get you warm when you are walking across an exposed mountain top in a blizzard... AND, be prepared to layer on and layer off as often as required.

This mostly works for me, but everybody is different. I have noticed that some people sweat a lot more than I do. If I had that problem, then I would carry a second base layer and take it off (along with all the sweat that it has soaked up) when I stop for a break. Put on the dry one, as well as the other warm layers on top. Of course, that means you have to change back into the wet one when you start walking again. You'd want to be sure that you will get warm enough in this case (eg, start walking in your dry one, and only swap it out for the wet one once you have warmed up and feel like you're about to start sweating again.

Hmmm... I think I'm rambing. I'm not sure I've thought that last bit through properly.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Biggles » Tue 18 May, 2021 3:58 pm

The principles of layering for the activity and environment have less to do with buttons and zips but how well and with what you layer.

Layer your clothing for the environment you expect to be in and the temperature. For example, you might start a 10km continuous (and arduous!) uphill walk with three layers, and progressively removing layers down to the base layer (as I've done many times on Victoria's Mount Bogong), keeping sweating to the most manageable and least threatening level as the temperature drops with altitude gain; at the top, a breather and re-layer. For very cold environments (e.g. alpine SE Australia, outback Central Australia), I layer with a 100wt merino tee, then a 150-220wt merino L/S and fleece/semishell jumper (with underarm zips and full length front zips), and in the pack I keep a spare 150 or 220wt merino L/S to change into and be snug and warm arriving at, camp or need to stop and get out of sweaty and cold clothing. There is a lightweight raincoat in there too, again with underarm zips to provide some improvement in temperature regulation.

The moment you stop, in very cold exposed conditions, and are saturated from sweaty walking you must change into dry clothing. A CHUX wipe is sufficient to quickly wipe down sweat, then a down jacket — and today's down jackets are small enough to be an essential comfort item on cold trips, is an ideal "instant warmer", and kept dry when carried in a proofed stuff sack. Unfortunately many people I have attended to with hypothermia in cold environments don't get the simple rule of layering to remain warm and dry, and critically, changing out when wet — "oh blah, blah, blah, that beginner stuff doesn't apply to me, I've been doing this for years!", and so forth.

I think pacing one's progress to actively, consciously avoid heavy sweating is also important.s
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby wildwanderer » Tue 18 May, 2021 5:02 pm

All good advice above.

I like the start cold approach. IE wearing a base layer, sometimes that's just a polynylon loose scrub shirt and a windshirt/rain jacket if theres wind..even if it's very cold in the mornings.
You soon warm up.. if you don't then put on a light mid layer like a 100 weight fleece.

If it's ridiculously cold i might start with the fleece on.

As others said don't be afraid to stop to take off layers as soon as you begin to heat up. Don't worry about annoying your walking companions. If they have experience they will understand.

Another good tip is to protect your extremities. With icy wind.. gloves and a buff for your face/ears really helps and minimises the overwarm/sweaty core but freezing face/hands issue.

Another thing to look at is your pack. How breathable is the back panel? Trampoline style harnesses with mesh back panel s (like osprey) help a lot to minimise sweaty back issues.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Moondog55 » Tue 18 May, 2021 5:13 pm

Yep Lighter weight base layer and a wind resistant or windproof layer over that does for me "most" of the time. That said when it is both really cold and really windy I need to layer up better.
I almost never change out of my base layers, as my UL layers tend to flash off dry quite quickly, but I keep a very warm parka right at the top of my pack along side my storm shell. I also always have at least 2 head coverings Slow dry time is why I stopped wearing woollens for ski touring when it's soggy and this being Oz it is too often soggy. The advice given above is good. I'm always adjusting my clothing.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby GrahameR » Tue 18 May, 2021 5:37 pm

Yep I get the sweating thing. Get it completely. Keep sweat to a minimum. And I also get it's possible to do this by reducing the work load (less speed, weight, terrain etc) and by reducing the layers. And start cold etc. And by having an appropriate base layer - and that seems to be the key point (not so much what is over it).

BTW, I'm talking about alpine environments - generally a combination of steep, rough, windy, cold and maybe thin air.

But on many/most alpine treks it is very difficult not to sweat - where walking naked for just a couple of kms a day on flat ground with no pack isn't part of the deal. So I'm talking about the problem of how to balance the internal heat and external skin chill - and the importance of the base layer.

From the recommended link I see that the best base layer is tight, hydrophilic and fast drying.

My understanding was wool thermals were good for these qualities - as are the (smellier) synthetics. However, in a cold windchill environment the evaporation is slow to non-existent effectively meaning a layer of dampness that is potentially dangerous (regardless of how warm the interior is). And given reasonably strong activity creates at least some sweat, then as I say the best I've found is front zips-buttons on the over layer(s) which allow quick, effortless and repeatable adjustments. (And I love pit vents for this reason too.)

But am I missing something? Is there a better way? Is there a better base layer than wool or synthetic 'thermals'?
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Moondog55 » Tue 18 May, 2021 5:50 pm

Personally I don't think there exists such a perfect base layer, UL polyester really is about as good as it gets.
Alpine white season I swap between Patagonia Everyday and Patagonia Thermal weight depending.
Patagonia no longer sell the Cap2 which was the best of all IMO
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby wayno » Tue 18 May, 2021 6:00 pm

a very open knit type of grid fleece. the fleece is more like small tufts minimising contact with the skin

https://www.macpac.com.au/mens/baselayers/prothermals

string vest is another way to go. they've made a comeback as a form of baselayer
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Biggles » Tue 18 May, 2021 6:13 pm

GrahameR wrote: [...]

But am I missing something? Is there a better way? Is there a better base layer than wool or synthetic 'thermals'?


Such as... what particularly??
We are spoilt for choice and range, but it seems for a number of people there will be difficulties and experiences that need some nuckling down on. Personally, I don't think there is a "one size fits all" approach to a system that works well in all conditions, and that experimentation, even a great deal of it, is necessary to strike a 'just-so' balance that you can comfortably use again and again. Merino burst onto the scene amidst much fanfare, claims and commotion. It is wool, just superfine, and I have found the quality does vary a lot. It's also expensive, and many people would take issue at paying e.g. something like $160.00 for a L/S merino top, especially in the absence of proving to yourself what definitely works and what does not. I don't have the answer to an alternative, other than packing your 'jammies... :P

Having underarm zips definitely enhances thermal regulation, even when you are battling a downpour. I generally won't buy an outer (rain)shell or a (wind)shell-fleece jumper without this valuable detail. I view it a bit like adjusting the velcro closure on my gaiters to let air circulate.

If you have the requisite pecs and hairy chest, and the Woodstock vibe appeals to you, as Wayno, above suggests, a string vest might just be the ticket. I've seen these too and fancied them, but sadly my days as a superspunk are long gone...
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Tortoise » Tue 18 May, 2021 7:59 pm

My 2c worth...

I've gone away from merino base layers because they take too long to dry, are heavier than synthetics when wet, and I didn't feel as warm.

This is the best base layer I've ever used. It might bring back the odd memory. :)
PP thermal.jpg


Got it in the 1980s, fortunately didn't pass it on when I put on too much weight to wear it, because it's been back in business for a few years again. It is a loose weave and actually does dry very quickly. I love the press studs that give the option of a high neck closure without a cold, bulky zip. Or I can have a half closure, or leave it open. It's been brilliant for cross-country skiing, snow-shoeing and alpine walking in all sorts of conditions. Bummer they don't make them any more. :(

I've also found a wind shirt (plus or minus a mid layer) a great option to avoid overheating when I'm huffing and puffing up a mountain in a freezing wind.

I'm much more wary of the 'Be bold, start cold' approach these days. Made the mistake after a decent overnight snowfall, of starting without enough layers on. I figured that scrub bashing uphill should warm me up. Shoulda realised that pushing through snow-laden bushes would keep my body temperature down...and me down and out.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby rcaffin » Tue 18 May, 2021 8:24 pm

For the most part, I think all this talk of base layers means that the problem is not understood.

Above 0 C we (my wife and I) wear a single windshirt made of Taslan. MYOG. It is loose so it can flap and ventilate. Sure, for the first few minutes we are cold, but once we get going we are fine. The thing is that the Taslan fabric does block the wind nicely, and that is all we need. That applies in the Blue Mts, Kosci NP, and in the mountains of Europe.

Now, if it is just below 0 C (which is somehow easy to guess with all that frost!), then we might wear a synthetic thermal top under the windshirt for the first quarter of an hour or so. Then it comes off when we are warmed up. If it is an actual ski trip we are a shade more cautious about getting either wet or too cold. A synthetic thermal top might then be in order.

We never wear wool or cotton in the bush. Wool is too delicate and sags when it get wet. Great advertising gimmick though. Cotton is deadly when it gets wet. Both take ages to dry, while synthetics can be dry in 10 minutes. Yeah, been there and done that - on Mt Tate in a storm for instance. There was snow too. Instead of a Taslan top in the snow, I wear an EPIC jacket top: it breathes fine, but repels snow. MYOG too.

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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Tino B » Wed 19 May, 2021 12:52 am

The lightest weight Patagonia Cap long sleeve with a well ventilated shell is all I wear in most cold, windy conditions. I start cold but maybe have a light buff, baseball cap and Ninja gloves but quickly shed these, only putting them back on if stopped or it’s very windy. The Capilene top dries very quickly and is very durable considering how thin it is. I don’t give a rats about the stink, it’s miles ahead of merino for active use.

On a recent cold trip in Tassie, I used a MacPac Nitro as a mid when stopped for photos, taking a break or eating. Polartec Alpha breathes and wicks amazingly well, dries in minutes and provides considerable warmth when a shell is over the top. I took another Nitro for my camp and sleep clothes.

Except for super light summer pants, all of my hiking pants have zip venting and are various weights of softshell. These provide protection from the wind but allow heat out - my new Klattermusen Misty 2.0 pants have venting thy pockets on the front and opening them immediately let’s heat out.

I got back into ski touring in 2919 after a long break and basically wore the same in some pretty gnarly conditions - Cap top and bottom covered by Gore-tex shells with pit zips and two way, full length zips in the pants which allowed me to vent but keep most of the cold out.

I prefer the cold because using this kit I can avoid overheating, sweating and then freezing.

In summer, I sweat so much that my synthetic hiking/sun shirt is caked with salt after a few hours and can stand in its own at the end of the day.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby north-north-west » Wed 19 May, 2021 8:09 am

rcaffin wrote:For the most part, I think all this talk of base layers means that the problem is not understood.

Above 0 C we (my wife and I) wear a single windshirt made of Taslan. MYOG. It is loose so it can flap and ventilate. Sure, for the first few minutes we are cold, but once we get going we are fine. The thing is that the Taslan fabric does block the wind nicely, and that is all we need. That applies in the Blue Mts, Kosci NP, and in the mountains of Europe.

Now, if it is just below 0 C (which is somehow easy to guess with all that frost!), then we might wear a synthetic thermal top under the windshirt for the first quarter of an hour or so. Then it comes off when we are warmed up. If it is an actual ski trip we are a shade more cautious about getting either wet or too cold. A synthetic thermal top might then be in order.

We never wear wool or cotton in the bush. Wool is too delicate and sags when it get wet. Great advertising gimmick though. Cotton is deadly when it gets wet. Both take ages to dry, while synthetics can be dry in 10 minutes. Yeah, been there and done that - on Mt Tate in a storm for instance. There was snow too. Instead of a Taslan top in the snow, I wear an EPIC jacket top: it breathes fine, but repels snow. MYOG too.


Geez Roger,
It's almost like different people have different bodies, with different metabolisms, that work differently in different conditions. Who wooda thunk it?

Some can't wear wool due to skin sensitivities. Some (ie me) can't wear certain synthetics next to the skin due to sensitivities. Some sweat more. Some have poor peripheral circulation, some good. Some have better (or worse) thermal regulation. etc etc etc

The fact is that there is no one single system that works for everyone in all circumstances.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Moondog55 » Wed 19 May, 2021 8:55 am

Hey Tortoise I do remember those PaddyMade
Great stuff but never long enough in the sleeves and I wore mine to death.
One of the smartest and best integrated clothing systems available; then and forever.
If they started making them again I'd be one of the first in line to buy.
But only if they get with the program and make Mens TALL fittings
Ve are too soon old und too late schmart
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Biggles » Wed 19 May, 2021 9:04 am

Tortoise wrote:My 2c worth...
This is the best base layer I've ever used. It might bring back the odd memory. :)
PP thermal.jpg



Yes, I'm familiar with that shirt from the 1980s, along with shawl-neck fleecy jumpers (a black one with red, but now pink inner collar remains and is sometimes worn!). I had and virtually wore out a red one (with grey collar) and grey version with blue collar. If they got wet, it was nothing a quick air dry couldn't fix, and that gave them universal appeal. Sadly, neither of my shirts remain (haven't seen them for more than 20 years). One item from that distant era of 'out-there' outdoor clothing that I still have and use is a pale fawn button-up PP SunShirt, which by estimates was purchased in 1985 in Melbourne! The longevity of this shirt has profoundly amazed me when one can buy uber-expensive clothing today and generally won't expect to be still wearing it 30 years forward!!

Their S/S and L/S "mesh" shirts were popular at the time, but the colours didn't gel well with everybody. Also, the snap-close buttons tended to come adrift from the fabric — pretty much impossible to repair in-field.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby slparker » Wed 19 May, 2021 9:56 am

A subject near an ddear to my heart.

I am a profuse sweater and tend to work hard when walking, skiing, snowshoeing etc.

Unfortunately I cannot comply with the exhortations to manage sweat by activity level - I wouldn't be able to walk slow enough to actually get anywhere - especially uphills in humid cool rainforest. Also, 36% of your body surface are is likely to have a layer of impermeable plastic attached to it (your pack) so good luck wicking through that...

So, now that this is out of the way - how does one manage sweat?

Unfortunately, baselayer and clothing companies tell a lot of marketing BS. base layers and mid layers don't wick sweat away and transport it into the aether - sweat accumulates into the base layer, soaking it and then soaking any other layer that is overlaying it so when yo get to the top of the ridge that trapped sweat conducts heat away from your skin. It is impossible (as per the advertising) for the base layer to be dry and the midlayer to be damp and evaporating water away unless the skin is very warm and dry - which isn't happening if you are warm because if you are warm you are sweating and it is a vicious circle... essentially base and mid are both sponges - if one is damp capillary action will ensure that the other one is as well.

Eventually you will either lose enough energy from heat production to dry your base layer (and both layers if you are wearing a midlayer) but you can get very cold in the process as generating enough heat to turn water from the liquid to vapor phase is energy expensive -which iis why we sweat in the first place - it works well to cool you down.

There is no magic baselayer that will keep you warm when it is wet nor is there one that dries rapidly without cooling you down - a lot. Clearly the lightest/thinnest baselayer possible will dry most quickly and presents the best option to limit the cooling effect of conduction through a damp base. The thinnest possible baselayer is none at all which is why the best base layers have sections where the baselayer fabric does not touch the skin or is absent completely, creating voids.

My suggestions:

Option A

[*]The best combo I have found in cold weather is a cycling mesh layer (polypropylene string vest) and a marmot driclime over the top (driclime is a pile-like layer with a windproof nylon shell over the top). The mesh doesn't really get wet but leaves voids of air over the skin for sweat to dry from. The pile of the driclime only contacts the skin intermittently so doesn't reverse wet the skin (i.e. wet out the skin from the damp midlayer). It is possible to dry out and cool down from exertion without excess chilling using this combo, but sometimes a few pushups is necessary to keep the torso warm.
Negatives: if the weather warms up this is horrible and impractical.

[*]Another combo that has worked for me recently is macpac nitro (polartec alpha) with a windlayer over the top if windy/damp - same principle as above and this works really well.
Negatives: if the weather warms up this is horrible and impractical, but less horrible than the above.

[*]Any polartec grid fleece (i.e. macpac prothermal) has a similar principle with voids in between contact patches and this is what I wear cycling which is a really difficult sport to stay warm without overheating or overcooling.
Negatives: if the weather warms up this is hot and sticky.

[*]non-void fabric - i..e uniqlo airism, any polyester base layer - soaks up water, and dries slowly in cool damp weather in my experience. If the weather warm sup this can be a good UV resistant warm weather layer.
Negatives: if the temperature drops up this layer stays damp and gets cold.


[*]wool - has pile like properties but I am not convinced of it's superiority over other non-void fabrics except for smell resistance. at the end of the day if you wet out wool with sweat it still has to be dried by your body heat.

[*]polypropylene - haven't worn non-void polypro for years as it is very plasticky, scratchy and smelly but is cheap and does not soak up any water at all - so theoretically should be best base layer fabric.

[*]as described in above posts - walk cool (if you can) this doesn't work particularly well for me unless it is really cold and windy, I sweat early and profusely once my core temperature gets up. But, nevertheless, never put on a midlayer unless you are cold half an hour after you start walking and have your core temperature raised to it's maximum.

Option B - don't worry - just stay warm and damp and keep walking fast enough to maintain core temperature, don't stop for long enough to cool down and change out of your damp gear when you set up camp. Can be dangerous if you get really really wet and cool down too much without noticing - a windproof layer is the best bet here

Option C - experiment with the above suggestions from others - I am intrigue by the windshell next to the skin concept of Roger's - this doesn't sound much different to me than wearing a nylon hiking shirt (fishing shirt) next to the skin - I have always found this quite chilling when wet from sweat but nylon dries fast so would be willing to give it another go. And, also, the going naked concept (i.e. taking off all upper layers when working hard) is also intriguing - the thinnest fastest drying baselayer is none at all.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Tortoise » Wed 19 May, 2021 11:19 am

Moondog55 wrote:Hey Tortoise I do remember those PaddyMade
Great stuff but never long enough in the sleeves and I wore mine to death.
One of the smartest and best integrated clothing systems available; then and forever.
If they started making them again I'd be one of the first in line to buy.
But only if they get with the program and make Mens TALL fittings

Yep, can't be perfect for everyone. Never had the problem of too short sleeves myself!

I actually contacted Paddy Pallin last year to see if there's any chance they might make something like this again. It's one they might well do, if they get into the position in the future where they can start their own manufacturing again. Clearly that's hard on a small scale in Australia.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Warin » Wed 19 May, 2021 11:39 am

Tortoise wrote:
Moondog55 wrote:Hey Tortoise I do remember those PaddyMade
Great stuff but never long enough in the sleeves and I wore mine to death.
One of the smartest and best integrated clothing systems available; then and forever.
If they started making them again I'd be one of the first in line to buy.
But only if they get with the program and make Mens TALL fittings

Yep, can't be perfect for everyone. Never had the problem of too short sleeves myself!

I actually contacted Paddy Pallin last year to see if there's any chance they might make something like this again. It's one they might well do, if they get into the position in the future where they can start their own manufacturing again. Clearly that's hard on a small scale in Australia.


Possibly a candidate for MYOG? What is the material? If that can be sourced in small quantities then there should not be too much of a problem.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Tortoise » Wed 19 May, 2021 12:09 pm

Warin wrote:
Tortoise wrote:
Moondog55 wrote:Hey Tortoise I do remember those PaddyMade
Great stuff but never long enough in the sleeves and I wore mine to death.
One of the smartest and best integrated clothing systems available; then and forever.
If they started making them again I'd be one of the first in line to buy.
But only if they get with the program and make Mens TALL fittings

Yep, can't be perfect for everyone. Never had the problem of too short sleeves myself!

I actually contacted Paddy Pallin last year to see if there's any chance they might make something like this again. It's one they might well do, if they get into the position in the future where they can start their own manufacturing again. Clearly that's hard on a small scale in Australia.


Possibly a candidate for MYOG? What is the material? If that can be sourced in small quantities then there should not be too much of a problem.

I'm hopeless at fabric ID. Do you know, Moondog? I've never seen any other clothing with a similar fabric/weave.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Biggles » Wed 19 May, 2021 4:33 pm

Tortoise wrote:I'm hopeless at fabric ID. Do you know, Moondog? I've never seen any other clothing with a similar fabric/weave.


PP TechTees (T-shirts and L/S shirts) were made of proprietary DriTech fabric in I think 7 colours. For a time in the late-1980s, Mountain Designs had something similar, not the same name.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby GrahameR » Wed 19 May, 2021 6:43 pm

A pretty interesting discussion. But with so many combinations of temp, RH, O2, load, fitness, track condition and grade it's no wonder there is no one solution. (Bugger!) However, I had specified alpine or alpine-ish so it's fascinating to see the relevant suggestions.

I hadn't realised there are sooo many different materials. I thought there was (mostly) polypropylene or wool or nylon or combinations ... but the multiple suggestions for highly specific materials or brand names makes comparisons tricky.

But I continue to experiment with different combinations esp on day walks. But having just done a six day (OT Tas) it is always a gamble on whether the combinations I take will work ... and of course if they don't there is no quick swapping of gear.

However, boards like this exist so we don't all have to individually experience everything before we get some expertise.

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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby Moondog55 » Wed 19 May, 2021 9:18 pm

I've been bushwalking for 55 years or so and still learning but the last decade or so of technological improvement has been amazing and everything is changing rapidly. But walking is still walking so nothing much has really changed at all except the weight and comfort
Ve are too soon old und too late schmart
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby ChrisJHC » Thu 20 May, 2021 8:56 am

I’m fairly warm-blooded and also sweat a lot.
I find that, in anything above about 10 degrees, I just wear shorts and a t-shirt.
I sometimes start with gloves and a beanie that I can easily remove on the go.
I might be cool for the first 15-20 minutes, but after that I’m very comfortable.

Below that, I’ll put on a very light top and - very occasionally - long pants.
Note that I rarely (deliberately) hike below zero.

I’m always amused when I come across people who are wearing full puffer jackets and heavy, full-length pants and complaining about how tough they’re doing it!
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby JohnnoMcJohnno » Thu 20 May, 2021 10:04 am

To the OP and contributors, I'm so glad I read this page. Of the group I regularly walk with I am the only heavy sweater. It is gratifying to read there are others out there. I used to walk in a short sleeve business shirt so you could unbutton the front while walking. These days it's a loose weave poly polo shirt - the collar seems to give you a bit more warmth around the neck area while letting the sweat and heat escape from the torso. Beanie in the pocket for when I take a breather. I keep the stops short so I don't cool down. That's about it.

My poly shirt was a company hand-out. I haven't found an equivalent anywhere. Poly shirts with a tighter weave still get soaked and uncomfortable and chilly in any sort of breeze.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby GrahameR » Fri 21 May, 2021 4:26 pm

Thanks everyone. Interesting and thought provoking discussion.

Cheers. G
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby crollsurf » Fri 21 May, 2021 8:29 pm

I can be sweating and cold at the same time although for some reason, my feet and legs don't really sweat much at all. I just make sure I have a windproof and warm top to put on when I stop, sometimes beanie and gloves as well. I like a merino base layer, it gets wet but it stays comfortable, everything seems to dry out at night unless I'm soaked through from rain.
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby GrahameR » Sat 22 May, 2021 4:41 pm

Biggles wrote:PP TechTees (T-shirts and L/S shirts) were made of proprietary DriTech fabric in I think 7 colours. For a time in the late-1980s, Mountain Designs had something similar, not the same name.


URL for DriTech fabric for those MYOG

https://discoveryfabrics.com/products/miti-dri-tech-stretch?variant=22198907207765
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Re: Sweating in the cold without risking hypothermia

Postby madpom » Wed 16 Jun, 2021 5:53 pm

Doesn't help you during the day. But my policy (being a sweater) is let it sweat, wash it off. I always wash off every night as soon as I make camp. Even if it means a 'snow scrub'. Brief discomfort,brief dip in skin temperature, but removing all that salt from my skin brings the overnight core body temperature I can maintain up significantly. Without it, I freeze at night.
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