Horses and heritage

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Re: Horses and heritage

Postby davidmorr » Wed 23 Feb, 2022 9:49 am

The issue now is the number of horses. In the original romantic time (1800s), there were about 200 iirc. Cattlemen used to shoot them as a pest which kept the numbers under control. If the horses go onto farmland adjacent to the park, they are still shot.

When the national park was declared, there were a lot of horse people unhappy because they were no longer allowed to ride their horses wherever they liked. So it became a political issue which the conservative side of politics chose to use to their advantage. And the horse people started pushing the romantic brumby idea, hoping to be able to get back into the park. They even said that if they were allowed in the park, they would do a brumby run and clear most of the horses out. (The hidden agenda here was that they would leave enough to justify having to do more each year. There are even stories of throughbreds being released into the park to improve the breed.)

When the numbers got too large to ignore, it was proposed to cull them. This became another political point. A limit of 200 horses per year was imposed. The horses were to be trapped and rehomed. This limit remained for many years, despite the fact that the breeding rate was higher than 200 foals per year. A few of the horses were rehomed, but most went to the abattoir. So each horse trapped cost $400 to end up as pet food.

Several surveys of the horse numbers have been done, showing quite large numbers, up to 20,000 at one stage iirc. The opponents reject all this, without offering any counter information on numbers. They cannot even say who they would believe.

This is my recollection. Others may correct any errors.
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Re: Horses and heritage

Postby Lophophaps » Wed 23 Feb, 2022 11:02 am

Watching the Man from Snowy River films it's fun to spot the mountains and places, and I enjoyed both films. The feral horse damage is another matter.

The science clearly shows damage by feral horses, many reports. Feral horse advocates rely on emotion for their views, not science. In that regard they are a few snags short of a barbie. Feral horses look beautiful, especially when at speed in slow motion. The damage they cause is far from beautiful.

Threatening someone may be an offence - each case is different. The death threats cited in Four Corners very much appear to be actionable, but it's necessary to catch the person making the threat then prove it in a court of law. Most of the feral horse advocates are cunning and keep a low profile, while their words are very visible.
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Re: Horses and heritage

Postby johnw » Wed 23 Feb, 2022 4:26 pm

Lophophaps wrote:Watching the Man from Snowy River films it's fun to spot the mountains and places, and I enjoyed both films. The feral horse damage is another matter.

The science clearly shows damage by feral horses, many reports. Feral horse advocates rely on emotion for their views, not science. In that regard they are a few snags short of a barbie. Feral horses look beautiful, especially when at speed in slow motion. The damage they cause is far from beautiful.

Lop, I think you've summed it up well. I also enjoyed those movies, and still watch them occasionally. And I've had personal encounters where brumbies have stampeded away and do look majestic. BUT, those films were set in another era and many (most?) others who watched/watch them are typically not bushwalkers or similar who have seen the current damage. I think they are likely romanticised by the stories and fall for the pro-horse propaganda. I saw something on morning TV recently referring back to those films and the hosts were unfortunately clueless. Sadly it reflected in their comments, which were sympathetic to the feral horses. I've seen the damage first hand many times now and it worries me that they seem to be getting higher into the ranges. Plenty of evidence around the Rams Heads, and a bit over 12 months ago I found these large droppings between Alice Rawson and Lake Albina. Horse?
Droppings A Rawson Albina route.JPG
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In Nature's keeping they are safe, but through the agency of man destruction is making rapid progress - John Muir c1912
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Re: Horses and heritage

Postby nezumi » Wed 23 Feb, 2022 11:35 pm

Tortoise wrote:I need to watch the whole of the Four Corners episode, but there's lots I don't get.

For many years, The Man from Snowy River was my favourite movie. Mt Howitt was my favourite place, and it was cool seeing places I loved in a movie. In the 1980s I spent many months in the high country, and it felt special to spot the very occasional mob of brumbies. But am I right in thinking:

- all the scientific evidence shows serious destruction by a feral species
- brumby advocates give absolutely no rational basis for rejecting all the science
?

And isn't it a criminal offence to threaten someone's life, or to incite violence, as some brumby advocates are doing on trackable social media?


Pretty much on all accounts. Very broadly it's a question of science vs emotion - which is hilarious given how many of the feral horse supporting crowd align to the "facts don't care about your feelings" school of politics.
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Re: Horses and heritage

Postby crollsurf » Wed 06 Jul, 2022 2:48 pm

Kosciuszko National Park Wild Horse Community Advisory Panel to form.
6-8 person panel. At least 1 conservation person to be included. At least one aboriginal person. Be interesting to see if Richard Swain gets picked. Interesting to see if Cockran gets picked as well.
https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/about-us/who-we-are/advisory-committees/kosciuszko-national-park-wild-horse-community-advisory-panel-and-scientific-advisory-panel#:~:text=The%20Minister%20for%20Environment%20has,Wild%20Horse%20Heritage%20Act%202018.
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Re: Horses and heritage

Postby johnrs » Wed 06 Jul, 2022 2:51 pm

Does anyone still believe in this process??
Here is a quote from the first entry in this topic way back in 2014.

"There is currently a review of the Wild Horse Management Plan under way. They are seeking input from anyone who has an interest in Kosciusko NP, which I imagine is bushwalkers from all over Australia.
https://engage.environment.nsw.gov.au/protectsnowies"

And the 2014 post refers to a previous enquiry in 2011
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