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Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Thu 16 Sep, 2021 4:31 pm
by taswegian
not sure if I've signed up or not, went through the process, but not having any social media whatsoever It seemed to run into a blank.
Not sure why that should be relevant. Bit disappointed!
Not everyone has such these days, but it seems an expectation.
Probably missed out, but I tried.

This is not a gripe but the powers to be might see this and if it needs changing then do so
Or am I the only one in that boat? :D

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Thu 16 Sep, 2021 4:42 pm
by Son of a Beach
I'm in the same no-social-media boat... but there was an option there to "share" by copying a link (and theoretically sending it to people by some other means), and this worked for me, even without actually sending the link to anybody else.

Then there was the rather painful next step of trying to figure out what step '3' actually involved, and do I really need to tap on 'Skip' a thousand times (OK 10 times), or can I skip the 'skip' step, or otherwise how do I complete step 3, and if I don't complete step 3, was my signature still included on the petition?

It is a rather poor user experience, which appears to be driven by the marketing team.

Maybe somebody should use their petition system to create a petition to improve their petition system? I would do it, but I don't want to have to go through the pain. Just signing a petition was frustrating enough.

Yes, I'm exaggerating (a bit)... first world problems, and all that... *Sigh*

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Thu 16 Sep, 2021 4:54 pm
by taswegian
thanks SOB
yes I went through those motions and tapped and ....

Agree on your comments re User experiences

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Thu 16 Sep, 2021 8:16 pm
by crollsurf

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Sat 25 Sep, 2021 10:20 am
by Nuts
Substantial and impressive Age article (you'll get one freebie read if not subscribed):

https://www.theage.com.au/national/uniq ... KzXUQXE0lc

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Sun 26 Sep, 2021 7:01 pm
by taswegian
Agree Nuts
Very impressive.
Interesting how any proponent never acknowledges what is being denied.
They extol the need and virtues of nights immersed in luxury but don't address the comments, and that the average bushwalker is now removed from such as they aren't permitted to camp!

Where does the following fit into any of these proposals where exclusive use is paid accommodation only?
That’s what’s known in park-management speak as the “recreation opportunity spectrum”. Some people desire a nice meal, a bottle of wine and a shower with their hike. Others need only a mattress and a dry track. And some people want to climb difficult ridgelines, carrying their own food and water and tent. Parks, whose upkeep is paid for by taxpayer dollars, need to cater for all.
Certainly doesn't align with their proposed exclusivity.

The following is, to me, justification why we need to strive to ensure wilderness is as little impacted as possible.
“We suddenly started seeing red kangaroos back in the landscape. Yellow-footed rock wallabies are back. We now get western quoll sightings,” the 55-year-old Carlow says, on the phone from Sydney. “Tourism can do a lot of good. Most operators know their livelihood is linked with the health of their environment.”
To base an argument for interruption into existing undeveloped areas on the above because "tourism can do a lot of good" is okay for degraded areas being bought back from the brink, but these aren't that in the first place.
I applaud the massive amount of work done in rehabilitation on old farmsteads on the mainland. It's commendable, but has no relevance here, in fact exact opposite, and to me shows how ignorant some are when their eyes light up at tourism, but gloss over when it comes to existing, untouched wilderness and how their perceived money making venture can possibly have any negative effect.

I'm old fashioned, as they say, when it comes to values, but I've lived long enough, seen enough, to know changes to our special places have changed them forever.
Unless someone in 50 years looks at these projects and applies the same logic to that applied to old farms on outback Australia and sets out to return it all to nature! :roll:

Those making these ventures possible in government really don't have an interest in wilderness as many know it and to them it's not an issue to be reckoned with.
That's, IMO, the problem, when they don't have the courage to say enough is enough, rather, "there's always room for one more".

When we're all gone no one will know what an idyllic life it was walking quietly in the great outdoors, soaking in the atmosphere, enjoying the scenery and all in its rawest of states.
What was lost is lost and the new norm is in.
That's what some in high places would want ushered in sooner than later.

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Thu 30 Sep, 2021 5:06 pm
by north-north-west
taswegian wrote:That’s what’s known in park-management speak as the “recreation opportunity spectrum”. Some people desire a nice meal, a bottle of wine and a shower with their hike. Others need only a mattress and a dry track. And some people want to climb difficult ridgelines, carrying their own food and water and tent. Parks, whose upkeep is paid for by taxpayer dollars, need to cater for all.


No they don't. Not only don't, they can't. And even if they did have something for everyone, somewhere, it doesn't follow that there has to be something for everyone, everywhere. There simply is not room for all types of desired experiences in every NP, every reserve, every ecosystem.

We need to get away from this people-first mentality in relation to environmental reserves and remember that they are supposed to exist primarily to protect the ecosystems. Human use is secondary.

Re: For Sale - Pristine Tasmanian Wilderness

PostPosted: Fri 15 Oct, 2021 10:26 am
by stepbystep
A recent walk along the South Coast Track revealed our friends at Tas Parks & Wildlife are still cool with developers scoping out and surveying potential hut sites for the proposed lodge based walk along the track. I investigated several of the sites I was informed about to find most are well hidden, however I found an area of trampled bush on the Black Cliffs in the obvious location and then at Louisa River they obviously forgot to remove the flagging tape. At this site I discovered several tapes in a pattern one could only describe as a lodge footprint, lots of trampled bush and a pad leading down to the river. The site on the edge of the Louisa Plains would require removal of dozens of trees and shrubs that include some rainforest species, eucalyptus and nice old tea tree.

244454353_4458395530873285_1758622531765164755_n.jpg


Details of the EOI proposal here https://www.cg.tas.gov.au/__data/assets ... _Final.pdf
An update to this - Mr Johnstone has sold his company 'Maria Island Walks' and along with it the EOI's his company pushed to an ASX listed company out of Queensland 'Experience Co.' This company is chaired and owned by the head of Tourism Australia, Bob East. So the big boys are now in town trying to privatise Tasmanias wilderness areas.

There are so many reasons this shouldn't happen. Here's just a couple.

• Degredation of wilderness values.
• Track upgrades required will cost $40 million +++ (public money for private company).
• People will die, or need regular rescuing.

Fishers & Walkers Tasmania are gearing up for this fight once we finally bury the Lake Malbena madness. Any and all support from the bushwalking community will be much appreciated.
You can find us on social media (FB, Twitter, Insta) for updates as they occur.

If you have any information you'd like us to handle discreetly in regards to this please contact me.

Cheers, Dan
Email: dsbism[dot]73[at]gmail[dot]com