Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby wildwanderer » Wed 06 Jan, 2021 9:41 pm

Like that instant gravy idea. Thanks!
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby GregG » Thu 07 Jan, 2021 2:38 pm

Trundlers wrote:
Rice, veggies and Tuna: Continental rice sachet, additional freeze dried veggies from Campers Pantry and regular dried peas from a little packet at Coles, allow to rehydrate with additional water (pot cosy) about 15 mins, then stir in 100g tuna sachet.

Mmmm, that makes me feel hungry! But a question please Trundlers: is the rice in packaged meals like eg Continental already cooked and only needs rehydration? I seem to vaguely recall that they require simmering for around the same time it takes to cook plain white rice so I assume so there is nothing to be saved in preparation time or fuel used, or have I got it wrong?
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Dexter » Thu 07 Jan, 2021 4:26 pm

Snooze wrote:I asked a Japanese ramen expert for you. The answer I got was Nissin lao ramen or Myojo chukazanmai ramen (from Japanese supermarkets). Edit: Sapporo ichiban (salt or miso flavour) is also good. Also if you want your ramen spicy or chili, get Nongshin shin ramen from Korean supermarkets.



Awesome! Thanks heaps!! :D
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby commando » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 12:36 am

Aldi Fruit Mince Pies Qty 6 for $1.40
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Zapruda » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 9:43 am

Trundlers wrote:Cheese sticks are mega processed but I like the weird saltiness if them when I have sweated my way up a steep climb. :lol:


Now we are talking! I love them, especially the Aldi stringer variety. Salty, apocalypse proof and delicious!
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Son of a Beach » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 12:32 pm

Zapruda wrote:
Trundlers wrote:Cheese sticks are mega processed but I like the weird saltiness if them when I have sweated my way up a steep climb. :lol:


Now we are talking! I love them, especially the Aldi stringer variety. Salty, apocalypse proof and delicious!


Instead of cheese sticks, just take a block of parmesan, pre-cut into smaller chunks. It doesn't go off, is extra salty, and tastes sooooo much better than cheese sticks. Oh, and it's actually real cheese.

Parmesan is so underrated. It's a great snack (even when not bushwalking) either with cracker biscuits, or just on its own.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Zapruda » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 2:51 pm

Son of a Beach wrote:
Zapruda wrote:
Trundlers wrote:Cheese sticks are mega processed but I like the weird saltiness if them when I have sweated my way up a steep climb. :lol:


Now we are talking! I love them, especially the Aldi stringer variety. Salty, apocalypse proof and delicious!


Instead of cheese sticks, just take a block of parmesan, pre-cut into smaller chunks. It doesn't go off, is extra salty, and tastes sooooo much better than cheese sticks. Oh, and it's actually real cheese.

Parmesan is so underrated. It's a great snack (even when not bushwalking) either with cracker biscuits, or just on its own.


A little condescending to assume one of the most popular cheeses in the world is underrated.

Parmesan, pecorino, grana podano are certainly not underrated in my household. I’m half Italian and with several chefs in the family. We go through a block of pecorino a week here. I’m all over it but thanks for the suggestion.

And yes, I take hard cheese bushwalking when I have the urge.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Son of a Beach » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 3:30 pm

Zapruda wrote:A little condescending to assume one of the most popular cheeses in the world is underrated.

Parmesan, pecorino, grana podano are certainly not underrated in my household. I’m half Italian and with several chefs in the family. We go through a block of pecorino a week here. I’m all over it but thanks for the suggestion.

And yes, I take hard cheese bushwalking when I have the urge.


My humble apologies... that was not directed at you. I meant that it is underrated by some of the population in general who don't appreciate that parmesan is good for more than just grating or shaving over the top of something. Even worse, some people think that those Kraft "parmesan" shakers contain parmesan, and have no idea what actual parmesan tastes like.

I do not have any Italian heritage, am far from any kind of cheese connoisseur and don't even know what pecorino or grana podano are. I grew up in a family that seriously underrated parmesan. But I do enjoy good food when I'm out walking. It was only while cleaning up after a parmesan grating/shaving accident that I figured out the truth about parmesan for myself.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Zapruda » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 3:46 pm

Son of a Beach wrote:
Zapruda wrote:A little condescending to assume one of the most popular cheeses in the world is underrated.

Parmesan, pecorino, grana podano are certainly not underrated in my household. I’m half Italian and with several chefs in the family. We go through a block of pecorino a week here. I’m all over it but thanks for the suggestion.

And yes, I take hard cheese bushwalking when I have the urge.


My humble apologies... I did not mean underrated by yourself. I meant that it is underrated by some elements of the population in general who seem to think that parmesan is only suitable for grating or shaving over the top of something. Many others think that those Kraft "parmesan" shakers contain parmesan, and have no idea what actual parmesan tastes like.

I do not have any Italian heritage, am far from any kind of connoisseur, and grew up in a family that seriously underrated parmesan. But I do enjoy good food when I'm out walking. It was only during a parmesan grating/shaving accident that I figured out the truth about parmesan for myself.


All good. I obviously read what you wrote in the wrong tone. My apologies :)

Agreed. Shelf stable Parmesan is sacrilegious. It was only a couple years ago that they discovered that roughly 10% of some of that stuff was wood pulp! Crazy. I’m sure the string cheese isn’t much better.

If you like the saltiness and hardness of Parmesan you will love pecorino! It’s made from sheep’s milk and is just delicious. More of a cooking cheese but I throughly enjoy it on its own.

Even “soft” cheese like Brie lasts a couple of days in my pack in the alps. I wrap it in a bit of cloth before leaving home and try to avoid handling it out in the bush. I wouldn’t bring a super runny cheese like some of the traditional French cheeses but the supermarket mass produced soft cheeses goes alright.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Lamont » Fri 08 Jan, 2021 5:17 pm

Not for too long out in the bush but ...what about some nice room temp fresh Pecorino to scoff Mmmm and chuck the rinds from your hard sheep or cow cheese in your soup, while it's cooking-but don't eat it. Mmmm
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Trundlers » Sun 10 Jan, 2021 2:34 pm

wildwanderer wrote:Like that instant gravy idea. Thanks!


No worries! Not first choice for food at home, but seems to taste awesome on the track!
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Trundlers » Sun 10 Jan, 2021 2:37 pm

GregG wrote:
Trundlers wrote:
Rice, veggies and Tuna: Continental rice sachet, additional freeze dried veggies from Campers Pantry and regular dried peas from a little packet at Coles, allow to rehydrate with additional water (pot cosy) about 15 mins, then stir in 100g tuna sachet.

Mmmm, that makes me feel hungry! But a question please Trundlers: is the rice in packaged meals like eg Continental already cooked and only needs rehydration? I seem to vaguely recall that they require simmering for around the same time it takes to cook plain white rice so I assume so there is nothing to be saved in preparation time or fuel used, or have I got it wrong?


Yes, it is the regular continental brand rice sachet. We use the rehydration method of cooking to conserve gas. Bring rice sachet contents to boil in pot (add additional water if adding more dried veggies), when boiling, put on lid, turn off gas, cover with pot cosy. Wait about 15 mins, check rice is rehydrated/done, stir in tuna sachet. Eat! :D
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Trundlers » Sun 10 Jan, 2021 2:39 pm

Zapruda wrote:
Trundlers wrote:Cheese sticks are mega processed but I like the weird saltiness if them when I have sweated my way up a steep climb. :lol:


Now we are talking! I love them, especially the Aldi stringer variety. Salty, apocalypse proof and delicious!


We use the uber-processed room temperature stable variety. :)
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Trundlers » Sun 10 Jan, 2021 2:42 pm

Son of a Beach wrote:
Zapruda wrote:
Trundlers wrote:Cheese sticks are mega processed but I like the weird saltiness if them when I have sweated my way up a steep climb. :lol:


Now we are talking! I love them, especially the Aldi stringer variety. Salty, apocalypse proof and delicious!


Instead of cheese sticks, just take a block of parmesan, pre-cut into smaller chunks. It doesn't go off, is extra salty, and tastes sooooo much better than cheese sticks. Oh, and it's actually real cheese.

Parmesan is so underrated. It's a great snack (even when not bushwalking) either with cracker biscuits, or just on its own.


We also love parmesan, pecorino, Romano etc cheeses. I guess we have never considered taking a chunk of these cheeses on walks before. I will go back to the drawing board for consideration as part of our track food supplies. :)
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Son of a Beach » Mon 11 Jan, 2021 7:57 am

Zapruda wrote:Even “soft” cheese like Brie lasts a couple of days in my pack in the alps. I wrap it in a bit of cloth before leaving home and try to avoid handling it out in the bush. I wouldn’t bring a super runny cheese like some of the traditional French cheeses but the supermarket mass produced soft cheeses goes alright.


Too right. I've occasionally used Brie or Camembert to make a nice melted cheese toastie: Cut a few slices into a flat bread (eg, mountain bread, or wrap), add some dried cranberries and pine nuts (or whatever else suits you), then fold the wrap closed and dry-toast it on your fry-pan or pot lid on the stove until the cheese melts. Delicious!

(Also works well with just cheddar and salami.)

In this one, it looks like I added rosemary and pistachios:

Toastie.jpg
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Zapruda » Mon 11 Jan, 2021 12:58 pm

That looks delicious. I’m going to borrow this idea when the weather starts to cool. Thanks.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Neo » Mon 11 Jan, 2021 1:43 pm

The $3 Coles brie travels well.

My go-to snacking cheese is the 200g vintage cheddar from Aldi.
Coles version comes in second.
Recently had a 24 month old one found in Woolies for around the same price.
All seem to be made in England.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Trundlers » Wed 13 Jan, 2021 10:15 am

A recent trip to my local Woolies (country not city) revealed an interesting find. Powdered Peanut Butter in the health foods section (top shelf near protein balls and bars). The product is called PB2 Powdered Peanut Butter, from USA. Jar states it is non-GMO.

Unfortunately it is a sweetened product. Plain option contains peanuts, sugar and salt. Second option also includes cocoa.

I am yet to try it, but have a jar of each to test. It can be reconstituted with water.

Has anyone else tried this product?
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby north-north-west » Wed 13 Jan, 2021 11:54 am

Zapruda wrote:Even “soft” cheese like Brie lasts a couple of days in my pack in the alps. I wrap it in a bit of cloth before leaving home and try to avoid handling it out in the bush. I wouldn’t bring a super runny cheese like some of the traditional French cheeses but the supermarket mass produced soft cheeses goes alright.


I like my Camembert runny. Or at least walky. Frequently carry a small round and half a pack of crackers. The cheese is in a pocket (even in summer) so it gets nice and warm and soft. The perfect lunch (especially with some fresh snow peas or capsicum) or small dinner. The last trip it didn't get eaten until day two and I'm not dead (yet).
It is however, best to shove it in a small gladbag, because sometimes during more vigorous walking the wrapping can burst and believe me, you have not yet experienced the full despair of trying (unsuccessfully) to clean your walking trousers until there's 250gm of Camembert melted into the fabric.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby crollsurf » Wed 13 Jan, 2021 3:32 pm

Trundlers wrote:A recent trip to my local Woolies (country not city) revealed an interesting find. Powdered Peanut Butter in the health foods section (top shelf near protein balls and bars). The product is called PB2 Powdered Peanut Butter, from USA. Jar states it is non-GMO.

Unfortunately it is a sweetened product. Plain option contains peanuts, sugar and salt. Second option also includes cocoa.

I am yet to try it, but have a jar of each to test. It can be reconstituted with water.

Has anyone else tried this product?


I just tried at home. I guess once hydrated, it costs about 2x the price of normal Peanut Butter.
You can eat it straight, doable and tastes nice but wouldn't recommend without having some water near by.
Mixed with water tastes just like the real thing.
Mixed with water and peanut oil, tastes the same.
Awesome UL hiking food so good find Trundlers.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Trundlers » Wed 13 Jan, 2021 5:31 pm

crollsurf wrote:
Trundlers wrote:A recent trip to my local Woolies (country not city) revealed an interesting find. Powdered Peanut Butter in the health foods section (top shelf near protein balls and bars). The product is called PB2 Powdered Peanut Butter, from USA. Jar states it is non-GMO.

Unfortunately it is a sweetened product. Plain option contains peanuts, sugar and salt. Second option also includes cocoa.

I am yet to try it, but have a jar of each to test. It can be reconstituted with water.

Has anyone else tried this product?


I just tried at home. I guess once hydrated, it costs about 2x the price of normal Peanut Butter.
You can eat it straight, doable and tastes nice but wouldn't recommend without having some water near by.
Mixed with water tastes just like the real thing.
Mixed with water and peanut oil, tastes the same.
Awesome UL hiking food so good find Trundlers.


Awesome! I see a day walk "in the field" test this weekend. :D
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby flingebunt » Mon 18 Jan, 2021 6:47 pm

I found the following Sri Lankan product at my local Indian Grocery store. It is basically dehydrated soy "meat" for $2. I tried the mixed vegetable flavour, but there is also chicken, lamb and other fake meat flavours. The instructions say soak for 10 minutes in hot water, but they hydrate fine in room temperature water.

I mention there, because the packet ways 90 grams, but I would say you would only need 20 or 30 grams for a meal when you add them to couscous. So instead of a packet of couscous (90 grams) and a sachet of beans (100 grams) you can use the soy meat instead, which saves you some grams.

I suspect the fake meat flavours are nicer than the vegetable flavours, but any of these could be great for vegetarians/vegans on the trail.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Hikrazy » Wed 03 Mar, 2021 7:51 pm

Not sure if I am the only one, but I love custard and puree fruit baby food sold in sachets. Long life and no refrigeration required. Very satisfying as a desert.
Also available are vegetable varieties.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Lamont » Thu 04 Mar, 2021 8:56 am

flingebunt wrote:I found the following Sri Lankan product at my local Indian Grocery store. It is basically dehydrated soy "meat" for $2. I tried the mixed vegetable flavour, but there is also chicken, lamb and other fake meat flavours. The instructions say soak for 10 minutes in hot water, but they hydrate fine in room temperature water.

I mention there, because the packet ways 90 grams, but I would say you would only need 20 or 30 grams for a meal when you add them to couscous. So instead of a packet of couscous (90 grams) and a sachet of beans (100 grams) you can use the soy meat instead, which saves you some grams.

I suspect the fake meat flavours are nicer than the vegetable flavours, but any of these could be great for vegetarians/vegans on the trail.

Nice find and feedback. Need a bleeding thumbs up emoji. Two thumbs up from me.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby jobell » Mon 08 Mar, 2021 1:48 pm

Aldi has a mushroom dehydrated quinoa in a 125g sachet. About 460cal once prepared. Cheap, nutritious (ingredients list relatively short and minimal nasties) and quick to prepare. One of my fav’s.


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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Neo » Wed 14 Apr, 2021 6:44 pm

Might have been said.
The pre cooked rice sachet, the ones that say 90 seconds in a microwave.

High moisture content so weighty but quick to prep. A 250g two person serving has 100g of carbohydrates.

I have heated one separately but now add some in at the end of the main dish to warm up.

Fine to carry I think for the speed and convenience. A straight dehydrated or freeze dried rice can be found beyond the supermarket.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby baldhead » Tue 27 Apr, 2021 8:53 pm

Cia seeds for breakfast
Prepack in freezer bags 60-80g cia with some dried fruit and milk or coconut powder. Soak overnight with a cup of water. Filling. Although high in protein fats low in carbs.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby ribuck » Wed 28 Apr, 2021 7:08 am

crollsurf wrote:
Trundlers wrote:...Powdered Peanut Butter...


Awesome UL hiking food...

It's not really ultralight, because it has less kilojoules/gram than regular peanut butter. I guess they remove most of the fat so that it can be dehydrated.

The powdered PB that I found at Woolies was 1650kj/100g, while the regular PB was 2050kJ/100g. So if you are going ultralight take regular PB (or mash up some pine nuts, which are over 3000kJ/100g).
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Joynz » Wed 28 Apr, 2021 8:24 am

I quite like the powdered peanut butter. Tastes much better than expected. I brought it for something different for lunch that is very light - rather than needing it to be super calorie dense.
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Re: Best hiking food finds from the supermarkets

Postby Eremophila » Wed 28 Apr, 2021 7:33 pm

jobell wrote:Aldi has a mushroom dehydrated quinoa in a 125g sachet. About 460cal once prepared. Cheap, nutritious (ingredients list relatively short and minimal nasties) and quick to prepare. One of my fav’s.


The cooking instructions are for microwave - do you simmer in a pot or just pour over boiling water?
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